Two Ayr and Alloway teams contested this competition that is decided on cumulative shot difference. Skip Geoff reports on the first game:

Game against a Dalmellington rink skipped by Margaret White: Bella, Ed, Charlie and Geoff lost the toss and a 2 in the first end but came back to even the score in the second.

After that a series of small adverse rubs resulted in Dalmellington reaching the sixth end with a score of 7 – 2. (The truth is that we were playing badly!). However in the seventh and final end excellent stones from our font end resulted in Charlie and Geoff facing a close with stones lying shot, T-high, on opposing edges of the head and a clear centre. Geoff’s final stone was a straightforward hit and lie, well managed by Charlie and the sweepers to take a 4 and make a final score of 7-6 to Dalmellington – as Charlie remarked “it’s not often that you see the losing rink dancing off clicking their heels! Despite the final score in this game, Dalmellington won the medal with the very low cumulative shot difference of 5.

Skip Ronnie reports on the second game:

Game against a Stewarton rink skipped by Douglas Reid:

The Club’s second game in the competition was held on Tuesday 12 January following the game earlier in the evening skipped by Geoff.

The rink, consisting of Ronnie Wilson, Neil Beattie, Alan Richmond and Ken Gray, drew perhaps the shortest straw to play against Stewarton Heather. Their skip was the “well kent” Douglas Reid supported by a rink of what appeared to be a rink of regular players.

The Ayr and Alloway rink started in strong and convincing form winning the first three ends however Douglas’s team then found their form and won the fourth end with a two. A&A then won the fifth but thereafter Stewarton took control winning the last three ends convincingly resulting in a win for them with a score of 10-5. As is often said the score did not really reflect the quality of game played for both parties – indeed the final stone for A&A turned out to be a good one in that it prevented Stewarton getting the vital combined score they might have otherwise achieved after their last stone which would have enabled them to win the overall competition – so “job accomplished” in that department!

The matches were played with good humour and sportsmanship and enjoyed by all.